Monthly Archives: July 2016

Ending Imprisonment’s Slavery With Border Enforcement

Capitalism is in a political deadlock with liberal democracy’s tyranny of the majority limited only by vague laundry list of selectively enforced “human rights”.

Breaking this deadlock requires empirically grounding the social sciences by sorting proponents of social theories into governments that test them: Sortocracy.

This means that the current model of “human rights” must be replaced with a single, well defined, right to vote with your feet. This right to vote with your feet necessarily implies three material rights:

  1. The material right to land.
  2. The material right to transportation.
  3. The material right to border enforcement.

#1 is obvious since you can’t put your social theory into practice without land. #2 is also obvious as people who cannot practically relocate cannot vote with their feet.

#3 _should_ be obvious but, due to the moral zeitgeist, it is not. Incarceration rates, particularly in the US, show us that there are two, fundamentally opposed, kinds of borders: Those that keep people out and those that keep people in. Of the two, the kind that keeps people in is least compatible with the right to vote with your feet.  Even the US’s 13th Amendment to the Constitution has provision for involuntary servitude: Slavery for those imprisoned.  Legalized slavery is increasing.  We see a prison-industrial complex arising at the interface of government and capitalism to exploit this loophole in the 13th Amendment.  The moral zeitgeist’s mandate is “let people in”.  What is not admitted is this necessarily entails walls that keep people from leaving who are found to be “criminal” by the admitting society.


The moral zeitgeist has to reconcile its moral outrage at imprisonment with its moral outrage at border controls. The only realistic answer to this is absolute enforcement of free emigration combined with absolute tolerance of restrictive immigration.